Intro

This art and music project guides children through creating a sculpture and soundscape representing contrasting emotions. It contains a series of 10 lessons across both art (5 lessons) and music (4 lessons) disciplines that will be implemented throughout the term and culminate in a group presentation, in the last week to the rest of the class.

Our project has been designed for a school residing in a rural, relatively low socio-economic area. The school does have access to art supplies, a specialised art room and some musical instruments, however, there is limited funding designated for these curriculum areas.

We have 26 children in our year 5 classroom with children aged between 9-11 years old; there is diversity in both age and ability. Children attend the school from a range of culturally diverse backgrounds. There is a range of learning difficulties that are presented through language and literacy. We have considered these challenges and have included multiple representations of concepts through the use of a range of multi-modal resources to maximise inclusion and diversity.

Based in a rural area our school has a strong ethos for sustainability and promotes environmental and cultural awareness throughout curriculum delivery. In supporting this ethos we have carefully chosen recycled, reclaimed and easily accessible materials. Sticks, natural or recycled materials could be substituted in place of the formwork for the sculpture if wire is unavailable.

Rationale

"Education in the arts is more important than ever. In the global economy, creativity is essential" (Dwyer, 2011).

Art and music provide platforms for children to imagine, express and create, developing skills for learning and development which can be utilised throughout their lives and education experiences. "The arts have the capacity to engage, inspire and enrich all students, exciting the imagination and encouraging them to reach their creative and expressive potential" (Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority [ACARA], 2014). We have considered how this project can successfully provide our students with the opportunities to reflect on individual experiences, to engage and enjoy a progression of lessons that allow them to express themselves through different mediums. The Year 5 curriculum outlines that students should be able to "select from a range of media, materials and technologies to create original artwork... reflect on the ideas, feelings and opinions... and consider how presentation will enhance visual appeal/aesthetics and audience engagement" (School Curriculum and Standards Authority [SCSA], 2014b).

The arts curriculum provides children with a means of expressing and presenting ideas in ways that are unique and meaningful. Key areas of development include fine and gross motor skills, language and problem solving. These skills are highly valued and utilised within language and literacy, mathematics and scientific curriculum areas. The process of creating art involves many decisions and choices, it encourages children to take risks, to explore diverse and abstract concepts which develop self-esteem and confidence, crucial in childhood development and learning success throughout all learning fields. Developing children who have the confidence to innovate, put ideas forward and to explore innovative ways of thinking and solving problems is crucial in today's society. The importance of teaching the arts provides benefits far beyond a lessons outcomes, a particular art piece or music composition research by Posner has shown that learning through the arts creates neural responses and networks in the child's brain, "each art form engages a neural network" (Posner, 2009).

This project engages children in the use of not only art but also music as a means of expressing their creativity and emotion, "collaborative music tasks can provide students with an opportunity to demonstrate positive social behaviours, particularly in same gender groupings and particularly for boys" (Baker & Harvey, 2014).

There is a focus on connecting learning across the curriculum specifically through English and health throughout this project. In health, students have been looking ways in which inappropriate emotional responses impact on relationships (ACPPS056). In english, they have been composing imaginative texts, identify and explain characteristic text structures and language features used in imaginative, informative and persuasive texts to meet the purpose of the text (ACELY1701). These cross curriculum links form a solid foundation for the project, particularly through the narrative poem and emotion discussed being the theme for both the artwork and soundscape. Described in detail is a modelled series of lessons that run through the process taken to produce the final artwork and soundscape.

It is hoped that any reader takes as much enjoyment from this work as the authors had in creating it and that it might be found useful and used as a template to deliver an engaging art and music experience to students. Each relevant content descriptor and learning outcome is highlighted within each of the lesson overviews.

References

Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority. (2014). The Arts: Learning Area. Retrieved from http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/the-arts/introduction

Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority. (2014). Personal and Social Capability: Introduction. Retrieved from http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/generalcapabilities/personal-and-social-capability/introduction

Baker, W.J., & Harvey, G. (2014). The collaborative learning behaviours of middle primary school students in a classroom music creation activity. Australian Journal of Music Education(1), 3.

Dwyer, M.C. (2011). Reinvesting in Arts Education: Winning America's Future through Creative Schools. President's Committee on the Arts and the Humanities.

School Curriculum and Standards Authority, Government of Western Australia [SCSA]. (2014). The Western Australian Curriculum (Music). Perth: Australia. Retrieved from http://k10outline.scsa.wa.edu.au/home/p-10-curriculum/curriculum-browser/the-arts/music2

School Curriculum and Standards Authority, Government of Western Australia [SCSA]. (2014b). The Western Australian Curriculum (Visual Arts). Perth: Australia. Retrieved from http://k10outline.scsa.wa.edu.au/home/p-10-curriculum/curriculum-browser/the-arts/visual-arts2

Lessons

Lesson 1

Learning outcomes

Development and application of artistic techniques and processes with: line (implied lines for movement and depth) to create artwork (ACAVAM115).

Success criteria

  • Students are aware of each the different elements of art.
  • Students can identify and create different types of line.

Resources

  • A3 handout
  • Pencils
  • Everyday/recycled objects to show students

Activities

Introduce art elements to the students (line, colour, shape, form, tone and texture).

Students view a selection of recycled/easily accessible materials to illustrate there are "lines" (organic and geometric) in these everyday objects, e.g. rectangular milk carton, an orange cut in half and chicken wire.

Students are each given large A3 handout and asked to draw within these using various lines e.g. thin, thick, jagged, curving and repetitive, creating a pattern within the circle.


Lesson 2

Learning outcomes

  • Communication and recording of music ideas using graphic and standard notation, dynamics, terminology and relevant technology (ACAMUM090)
  • Development and consolidation of aural and theory skills, including: rhythm, tempo, etc. to compose and perform music (ACAMUM088)

Success criteria

  • Students will demonstrate knowledge of the music elements of beat and rhythm when playing Matthew, Mark, Luke and John.
  • Students will identify and draw music notes and their values.

Resources

  • Elements of music sheet
  • Paper plate note activity

Activities

Explicit teaching of music elements:

  • Loops/Ostinatos: repeated patterns of sound
  • BEAT: pulse or heartbeat underlying the music
  • RHYTHM: sounds and silences over a BEAT.
  • HARMONY: two or more sounds simultaneously
  • EXPRESSION: DYNAMICS (loud/soft) and TEMPO (fast/slow)
  • TONE/TIMBRE: the colour or texture of a sound

Introduce game of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John; focus on beat and rhythm.

Create paper plate notes.


Lesson 3

Learning outcomes

  • Development and application of artistic techniques and processes with colour to create artwork (ACAVAM115)
  • Previous knowledge about emotions from Health, (ACPPS056); and English, publish imaginative texts (ACELY1704)

Success criteria

  • Students can create a primary and secondary colour wheel.
  • Students understand that tone can be used to create depth.

Resources

  • Colour wheel handout
  • Paint brushes (or fingers for finger painting!)
  • Acrylic paints

Activities

Students create primary and secondary colour wheel for warm and cool colours.

Teacher models how to blend colours to achieve others, e.g. blue + red = purple.

Students examine the progression from white to black and the importance of value.

Students use coloured pencils to colour in handout from previous week with the goal of expressing a certain emotion or state, e.g. excited, angry etc.


Lesson 4

Learning outcomes

  • Development and consolidation of aural and theory skills, including: rhythm, tempo, etc. to compose and perform music (ACAMUM088)
  • Improvisation with and organisation of the elements of music to create simple compositions (ACAMUM089)
  • Development of performance skills (ACAMUM090)

Success criteria

  • Students will keep the beat during body percussion games.
  • Students will change tempo and add rhythm to body percussion games.

Activities

Warm up: Matthew, Mark, Luke and John.

Students play Magic Feet Follow the Beat.

Work in art groups to create a 20 second body percussion composition together to be shared with the class.


Lesson 5

Learning outcomes

Development and application of artistic techniques and processes with: line (implied lines for movement and depth) to create artwork (ACAVAM115).

Success criteria

  • Students are aware of each the different elements of art.
  • Students can identify and create different types of line.

Resources

  • A3 handout
  • Pencils
  • Everyday/recycled objects to show students

Activities

Introduce art elements to the students (line, colour, shape, form, tone and texture).

Students view a selection of recycled/easily accessible materials to illustrate there are "lines" (organic and geometric) in these everyday objects, e.g. rectangular milk carton, an orange cut in half and chicken wire.

Students are each given large A3 handout and asked to draw within these using various lines e.g. thin, thick, jagged, curving and repetitive, creating a pattern within the circle.


Lesson 6

Learning outcomes

  • Development and consolidation of aural and theory skills, including: rhythm, tempo, etc. to compose and perform music (ACAMUM088)
  • Improvisation with and organisation of the elements of music to create simple compositions (ACAMUM089)
  • Development of performance skills (ACAMUM090)

Success criteria

  • Students will create sounds that identify emotions using musical instruments as well as natural and recycled materials.
  • Students will collaboratively plan and perform a music soundscape.

Resources

Activities

Play rainforest soundscape for students to listen to without visual, then discuss to predict theme. Soundscape is played again and predictions discussed.

Identify the different sounds and their meaning within the soundscape.

Students work together to create a 30 second soundscape on angry or calm to present to the class.


Lesson 7

Learning outcomes

Development and application of artistic techniques and processes with shape and texture to create artwork (ACAVAM115).

Success criteria

  • Students will be able to use the papier mâché technique to add detail, volume and texture to their own sculptures.
  • Students will be able to see the progression from line (the chicken wire base) to shape and form.

Resources

  • Newpaper
  • Flour, water and salt
  • Containers (e.g. old icecream containers)
  • Balloons and aprons for each student
  • Empty plant pots/circular containers to sit balloons in to dry.

Activities

Students provided with newspaper and a flour and water papier mâché mixture.

Students papier mâché a balloon. Teacher models vertical and horizontal layering, illustrating how it is possible to create volume, texture and detail.

Students papier mâché their own sculptures.


Lesson 8

Learning outcomes

  • Communication and recording of music ideas using graphic and standard notation, dynamics, terminology and relevant technology (ACAMUM090)
  • Improvisation with and organisation of the elements of music to create simple compositions (ACAMUM089)
  • Development of performance skills (ACAMUM090)
  • Response that identify and describe how the elements of music work together to convey meaning and purpose, using music terminology (ACAMUR091)

Success criteria

  • Students will create sounds that identify emotions using musical instruments as well as natural and recycled materials.
  • Students will collaboratively draft a written soundscape.
  • Students will plan and perform a soundscape.

Activities

Explicit teaching on drafting a soundscape. Model and perform basic soundscape.

Students draft and perform a 30 second soundscape to class, based on emotional transition, working towards their final presentation.

Students work in groups using symbols, legend and a table to draft their own soundscape.

Plan and produce soundscape to perform in next lesson.


Lesson 9

Learning outcomes

Development and application of artistic techniques and processes with: shape, colour, line, space, texture and value to create artwork (ACAVAM115)

Success criteria

  • Students apply their knowledge about primary and secondary colours to blend paints.
  • Students art piece has evidence of line, shape, form, tone, space, colour and texture.
  • Students create a sculpture with evidence of a particular emotion.

Resources

  • A variety of paint brushes
  • Paint rollers
  • Acrylic paints
  • Flat, plastic surface to blend paints e.g. icecream container lid

Activities

Students paint their sculptures white and place in a sunny area to dry.

Students plan/design colours to use on their finished piece.

Students begin to use colour to paint their sculptures. Students can come in after school for an hour and paint if they require the extra time.


Lesson 10

Learning outcomes

  • Presentation and reflection of ideas, feelings and opinions in artwork (ACAVAM116)
  • Presentation and display of artwork to enhance visual appeal/aesthetics (ACAVAM116)
  • Development of performance skills (ACAMUM090)

Success criteria

  • Each student/group has completed an art piece.
  • Each student participates in the performance of their soundscape.

Resources

  • Completed art pieces
  • Completed soundscapes
  • Musical instruments needed for soundscape performance

Activities

Students present both their art piece and their soundscapes to the rest of the class.

Students explain the emotions they have chosen, how they relate to their poems and where they are evident in their painted sculptures.

Credits

Jennifer

Wrote the narrative poem and a portion of the art lessons.

Montana

Wrote up all of the music lessons.

Ben

Came up with the concept for the art piece and sculpted the formwork. Wrote the introduction and produced the website.

Bobbi

Composed the final lessons and put the elements of the written assignment together.

All:

  • Contributed to the planning and construction of the art piece (the papier mâché and painting).
  • Actively participated in the composition of the soundscape.
  • Rehearsed and practised the soundscape presentation.
  • Research the written component.
  • Wrote up elements for the written assignment.

Everyone's creative ideas and opinions were respected and considered. We collaborated in a co-operative and professional manner throughout this assignment.